News and updates on research on livestock value chains by the International Livestock Research Institute and partners

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Study characterizes West African farmers' knowledge of cattle trypanosomosis


Farmers in the cotton zone of West Africa play a major role in the successful management of trypanosomosis, according to an article published in the August 2009 issue of the journal Acta Tropica.

The article titled Characterisation and validation of farmers' knowledge and practice of trypanosomosis management in the cotton zone of West Africa reports the results of a survey by researchers from ILRI's Market Opportunities Theme -- Delia Grace, Hippolyte Affognon and Thomas Randolph -- and partners on how farmers manage cattle trypanosomosis in Burkina Faso, Guinea and Mali.

The survey covered 895 farmers keeping 14,450 cattle.

Most farmers knew the common signs of trypanosomosis and considered it the most important cattle disease. Farmers used integrated strategies to prevent and control the disease, such as administering trypanocidal drugs, avoiding high-risk areas and keeping trypanotolerant cattle.

The researchers recommend further studies on the costs and benefits of farmer treatment of animals, in light of the importance of rational use of veterinary drugs.

Citation
Grace D, Randolph T, Affognon H, Dramane D, Diall O and Clausen P-H. 2009. Characterisation and validation of farmers' knowledge and practice of trypanosomosis management in the cotton zone of West Africa. Acta Tropica 111(2): 137-143.

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